GoToConnect VoIP is a simple setup if you buy their preconfigured phones—which come from recognized names like Cisco, VTech, and Panasonic, so quality isn’t an issue. GoToConnect’s customer service is US-based, with 24/7 phone, live chat, and email options, as well as specific lines for small businesses, larger businesses, government entities, and education clients. GoToConnect also hosts an exhaustive YouTube channel dedicated to understanding phone systems and features.
That being said, Grasshopper doesn’t offer any conferencing tools. For that, you’ll have to sign up for join.me—Grasshopper’s sister company. This service offers both video and audioconferencing, but it does cost an extra $10–$30 per month. That’s another strike against Grasshopper, since most providers in Grasshopper’s price range include conferencing features.

Multiple Numbers on Demand – Building a multifaceted business phone service with any kind of localized number or vanity number. Whether it’s business VoIP solutions for small business, enterprise, or contact center, communications is only as strong as it is dynamic, with multiple numbers, all having specific assignments to fulfill. Some business Voice Over IP phone providers will offer these additional numbers for free, or an additional small monthly fee. Explore options to find out if a provider supplies key components beyond a local number such as toll-free numbers, virtual faxing, and virtual extensions.
Cable companies and Internet providers will also provide a bridge device where your phones stay the same and the VoIPing simply happens on the back-end. Just remember that these devices dictate what kinds of features the provider can offer you, so be sure you know what these devices are capable of since there'll likely be more than one model to choose from.
When people mention voice over IP (VoIP) most are thinking about a business phone service rather than home phone. After all, businesses run data networks and that's what VoIP needs to operate. But now that the majority of homes have an Internet connection, that means they're also running a data network, just usually a smaller and simpler one than you'd find at the office. If you're careful about what you buy, you can take advantage of VoIP's key benefits, which include far more features and a much lower price tag than an old fashioned landline.

However, for many businesses there's a need to route calls to the PSTN and other analog phones that might remain in use, too. This may mean a PSTN gateway, or even a hybrid PBX, where there's at least a small telephone switch located on-site. Note that these days, a PBX looks exactly like the other servers in your data center, except with an attached means of handling local and analog phones. Many small businesses, however, are avoiding on-premises PBXes partially due to cost savings and partially because the capabilities offered by all-cloud systems are more than advanced enough for their needs. Some virtual cloud PBXes can handle PSTN connectivity without on-site hardware requirements.


The interest that VoIP technology is generating for consumers and businesses alike, is creating a high level of demand that is being addressed by more and more providers entering the market. Choosing the best home phone service can now be a challenge as it can be difficult to compare providers that have different pricing structures, different features and different contract terms. Many residential providers names are becoming familiar in the home, such as Vonage, MagicJack and Ooma. Vonage, one of the more expensive options today, is popular due to its unlimited international calling feature. Evaluating Vonage competitors can save you even more money depending on your exact needs.

Phone.com straddles the line between business and residential VoIP with a bunch of pricing plans suited to families. It structures its packages a little differently than its competitors. Customers can choose between pay-per-minute plans, which are cheaper but have fewer functions, or unlimited plans, which are more expensive but all-inclusive. The pay-per-minute plans come with a 30-day money back guarantee.
You know Verizon; everybody knows Verizon. It’s a mobile leader, and its ultra-fast Fios (fiber-optic internet) service is expanding rapidly—so of course it’s also in the VoIP business. Verizon has built-in  bring-your-own-device (BYOD) solutions, as well as the internet connections (both fiber-optic and DSL) to support a reliable VoIP business service. Consolidation of all your business’s telecommunication needs into a single bill could be easily accomplished with Verizon. It would be more convenient than cheap, however.
Phone Power is another home VoIP provider that runs its service using an on-premises device. This is called the Home Adapter and like other services, it sits between your phones and your Internet connection, though no other network is required. It can even function as a router on its own. While it's not the cheapest home VoIP solution we found, it's certainly well-regarded and mature with a wide variety of options and capabilities.
However, you may also want features like on-hold music, call queues, voicemail to email translation, and automatic answering and forwarding of calls. If all of the employees are working out of the office, you can use the automatic attendant to determine which employee should receive the call. The attendant then can route the call to that employee’s mobile phone.

Each provider will disclose international calling rates on their website and a list of features on their website. We give a standardized list for each provider (with explanations on our VoIP Calling Features page) but providers experiment with different features all the time. Check their website (using a link on their details page) to verify how each  feature works.
Other basic features to consider include the phone itself should your provider offer its own handsets. Many residential providers don't since their bridge devices allow them to work with old-style landline phones, but some, especially the larger and more business-oriented players, do offer special VoIP phones. These look and work the same as a regular phone aside from the initial setup process, which will require making sure the phone is connected to your Internet router in some way and then configured to access the VoIP provider's service from there.
The Yealink SIP-T56A is a simple-to-use smart media phone that provides an enriched HD audio experience for business professionals. This all-new smart media phone enables productivity-enhancing visual communication with the ease of a standard phone. the SIP-T56A features a seven-inch fixed multi-point touch screen, integrated Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 4.0+ EDR, and it is coupled with a built-in web browser, calendar, recorder and more, which also support the installation of third-party applications for business customization. Thanks to the DECT technology, if you want to expand your horizons for busy environments, or, share one phone system with your small team by adding multiple handsets, simply turn Yealink SIP-T56A phone to the corded-cordless phone, and it will repay you up to 4 DECT handsets in total to meet your daily demands.
When people mention voice over IP (VoIP) most are thinking about a business phone service rather than home phone. After all, businesses run data networks and that's what VoIP needs to operate. But now that the majority of homes have an Internet connection, that means they're also running a data network, just usually a smaller and simpler one than you'd find at the office. If you're careful about what you buy, you can take advantage of VoIP's key benefits, which include far more features and a much lower price tag than an old fashioned landline.
It's also possible to switch a call from a mobile device to a desktop line or vice versa. Business products generally offer several pricing levels based on the number of lines needed, ranging from approximately $20 per line for large organizations to $35 per line for smaller groups. Even from an administrative perspective, you should be careful, however, when migrating to a new phone system. Whether you're an individual just buying a new land line or a business moving from an old-style PBX system, or even just switching to a different VoIP provider, the process should be approached carefully and only after thorough planning.
While there are still a few other legacy protocols around, and a few non-SIP standards, such as H.232, SIP is what's used for the vast majority of modern VoIP phone systems. The most common use I've seen for H.232 has been in dedicated video conferencing systems. SIP, meanwhile, handles phone service, video conferencing, and several other tasks just fine, which is why its use is so widespread. Where it has trouble is with data security, but more on that in a bit.  
VoIP or Voice over Internet Protocol, is a phone service that operates over the Internet. It creates a digital signal from an incoming or outgoing call. After this, it converts that signal to reach members who are not using VoIP. This cloud-based solution allows you to receive calls from a VoIP phone, any phone with a VoIP adaptor, mobile hotspot, or computer.

Yes it is really this simple. Just connect your telephone adapter to your home Internet by connecting a cable between it and your router or modem. Then connect your existing phone to the adapter and you should be good to go. If you decided to use your own adapter, you will likely be required to run a quick configuration script that is supplied by your service provider.

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