Few things in life are set in stone, and the same should be true of your VoIP plan. It’s wise to find a plan that is scalable and which you can easily expand if need be. You’ll want to know if you can break your contract early if you find a better deal elsewhere, or if you can easily switch plans with the same company in order to take advantage of more features, or to get rid of some you don’t need. 
When people mention voice over IP (VoIP) most are thinking about a business phone service rather than home phone. After all, businesses run data networks and that's what VoIP needs to operate. But now that the majority of homes have an Internet connection, that means they're also running a data network, just usually a smaller and simpler one than you'd find at the office. If you're careful about what you buy, you can take advantage of VoIP's key benefits, which include far more features and a much lower price tag than an old fashioned landline.
Phone.com straddles the line between business and residential VoIP with a bunch of pricing plans suited to families. It structures its packages a little differently than its competitors. Customers can choose between pay-per-minute plans, which are cheaper but have fewer functions, or unlimited plans, which are more expensive but all-inclusive. The pay-per-minute plans come with a 30-day money back guarantee.

One important advanced feature that's ubiquitous in the world of business VoIP services, and quickly growing in the residential market, is the softphone app. Imagine a piece of software that simply uses the network connection, speakers, and microphone of your computing device to turn that device into a phone. If that softphone is attached to your VoIP account, that software will ring whenever your home phone does and when you place calls on it, those calls will register as coming from your home phone number. Just by installing the software you'' be able to immediately place and receive voice calls over your home phone account on your PC, your Apple iPad, or even your smartphone. That last one is a gotcha, however.
Designed for busy executives and professionals, Yealink SIP-T52S is an easy-to-use Media IP Phone with a 2.8-inch color-screen and a distinctive appearance and structure. For its simplified and user-friendly design as well as user interface, it brings the IP phone and users closer to an unparalleled operating experience. With Yealink Optima HD voice technology, T52S enhances its audio quality, adding Opus audio codec delivering superb audio and voice communications.

Businesses need a number of phone features to improve their productivity and efficiency. The investment in achieving this with a fixed landline service is high, while many VoIP providers offer many of these features for free. Even for the more advanced services paid for, a VoIP service costs significantly less than a regular landline phone service. https://www.lascomsolutions.co.uk/
Similar to Ooma's residential service (below), AXvoice deploys its home VoIP with the help of an appliance, appropriately called the AXvoice Device, which sits between your home's phones and your Internet router. This device not only serves as a bridge between your old phones and the new VoIP service it also enables many of the advanced features that straight POTS bridges often don't address.
While we think Grasshopper is great for small businesses, it misses out on our “Best Small-Business Phone Service” title because, compared to Ooma, Grasshopper is a little expensive. Grasshopper plans start at $26 per month, assuming you sign up for annual billing. And starting plans include only one business phone number with up to three extensions.
GoToConnect has nearly as many glowing critical reviews as the Radiohead discography, minus the pretentious lyricism. GoToConnect has established a positive industry reputation since its launch as Jive in 2006, thanks mostly to its interface simplicity, focus on small businesses, and large array of telephone features that are available to all pricing tiers.
Businesses working remotely should keep in mind, though, that Ooma doesn’t offer any videoconferencing tools. Instead, you get a conference line that lets at-home employees collaborate over the phone. That puts Ooma a pace behind some of the other providers on our list, but with providers like Nextiva currently offering their video collaboration tool to businesses for free, it shouldn’t be a major issue.
That covers VoIP basics, but what about the more advanced options, and why is VoIP able to offer more advanced features where a regular phone can/t? Again, the secret is software. A VoIP system, whether home or business, can access a much richer software layer than a standard line from the plain old telephone service (POTS). On the business side, this flexibility has extended to integrating VoIP with other forms of communication to such a degree they all become a single platform, generally called Unified Communications as a Service (UCaaS). You won't anything that sophisticated when you're shopping for residential service, however.

Residential VoIP reviews submitted by real users can be a great tool when trying to decide which provider is the best choice for you. Each review includes ratings for various aspects of the service, such as sound quality, features, customer service and more, as well as their personal comments based on their experience of the service. Reading reviews is an essential part of the decision making process.


One of the most exciting and clear differences between a cloud PBX provider and a standard telephone system is software. Your IT staff will find a host of new software tools to help monitor and manage the system. But what catches most business operators' eyes are two key capabilities that software provides: back-end integration and softphones. The latter is exactly what the name implies, a phone that's rendered entirely in software allowing any compatible device to become a phone as long as it has an internet connection, a speaker, and a microphone. More on that below.
Setting up a residential VoIP system can mean big savings on your phone bill, especially if you make a large number of long distance and international calls. In addition, these systems are mobile-optimized, and provide a wealth of features that may just change the way you think of your home phone service. Take a look at the features you need and the budget you can handle, and make the decision that’s right for you.
BYOD stands for bring your own device. This term refers to employees conducting company business on personal laptops, tablets, and phones instead of on company-owned gear. Most VoIP companies offer BYOD features and solutions within their plans, either included or at additional cost. However, extra IT security layers and company guidelines for BYOD are on you.
We recognize that not all our readers’ businesses are based in the US. So we took another pass at our content to provide more information on each provider’s international offerings. And because 8x8’s international rates on calls made from the US are so good, we bumped it up to our number five spot. Finally, we added info about Ooma’s new plan (Ooma Office Pro) to the offerings mentioned below.

Editors' note: Line2 is owned by J2 Global, the parent company of PCMag's publisher, Ziff Media Group. If you have questions you need answered about business VoIP, then remember to subscribe to PCMag's Small Business Newsletter and join the [email protected] business community on LinkedIn, and you can ask vendors, other professionals like yourself, and PCMag's editors.   
What makes SIP so popular is not only that it's deep and flexible, but also because it was purpose-built to engage in multimedia (meaning not just audio but also video and even text) communications over TCP/IP networks. For VoIP calls, SIP can set up calls using a number of IP-related protocols, including the Stream Control Transmission Protocol (SCTP), the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP), and the User Datagram Protocol (UDP), among others. But it can also handle other functions, including session setup (initiating a call at the target endpoint—the phone you're calling), presence management (giving an indicator of whether a user is "available," "away," etc.), location management (target registration), call monitoring, and more. Despite all that capability, SIP is simple compared to other VoIP protocols primarily because it's text-based and built on a simple request/response model that's similar in many ways to both HTTP and SMTP. Yet, it's still capable of handling the most complex operations of business-grade PBXes.  
Your company needs real time access to manage your phone system in or out of the office. Our online interface makes it possible to manage your system from anywhere with voicemails, call logs, call recordings, and call routing being just a click away. If you don't have time to make technical changes, our support staff are available for all your needs.
Once familiarized with VoIP services,  hone in on what these features can do for you and how to transition to the next level. First and foremost, is cost – a universal concern for anyone. Check the provider’s plans and pricing and be sure they’re the most cost efficient for your calling needs. There is also quality & reliability, portability, customer support, and a satisfaction guarantee; all key factors that may be clinchers or deal-breakers when going through the process.
When you're considering a new VoIP phone system for your business, it's important to include stakeholders from all of the key parts of your business in the planning and decision making process. Yes, this especially includes the IT staff and the data security folks since your voice communications will now be data. But it also needs to include folks who will be using the system to get work done, especially the work that drives revenue and engages customers. These people have invaluable insights into what's really needed versus what's simply cool and new. Plus, you'll need their input to select a phone system that will actually move your business forward as well as fit into your IT environment.

The advanced Yealink EXP20 is an ideal IP phone system for receptionists, administrative assistants or contact center workers who need to monitor and manage a large volume of calls on a regular basis. The Yealink EXP20 is flexible, powerful and contains a large user-friendly liquid crystal display (LCD) interface that measures 160×320 pixels. As well as contains 20 physical, dual-color LED keys. The additional screen space and added number of buttons simplifies user navigation and streamlines essential operational. Up to six EXP20 phone systems can be strung together on a single daisy chain.
Grasshopper isn’t technically a VoIP and it isn’t technically for residential customers, but it offers basically the same service for a competitive price. Technically speaking, Grasshopper is a cloud-hosted system that works on top of your existing landline or cell service so voice quality doesn’t suffer. While there’s a technical distinction, customers shouldn’t notice the difference. Grasshopper is built for entrepreneurs and small business owners who work from home. The Partner package is suitable for families, as it includes 3 separate contact numbers with up to 6 extensions. 
With integration being at the heart of VoIP and UCaaS, you can't make a purchasing decision here without thinking about the future. On one side, think about what you'll need in 1-5 years. On the other side, consider each vendor carefully to see what they've done over the last half decade in terms of product development and keeping up with VoIP and UCaaS trends.
One advantage of the traditional landline services is that electrical power is sent over the telephone wires so your phone service is isolated from your house power. This meant that your phone service would continue to work if your house power went out. However, with VoIP, power is used not only for the ATA, or the IP phone, but it is also used for your Internet modem and router devices. No power also typically means no Internet service.
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